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How to Avoid Gender Bias in Performance Reviews

2019-11-20T11:51:36+11:00

Love them or hate them, performance reviews are an annual staple in the majority of companies. To ensure business success, most organisations have a performance evaluation process. This might include including goal-setting, performance measurement, regular performance feedback, self-evaluation, employee recognition and documentation of employee progress. Performance reviews are supposed to be objective with employees being rated against a scale to ensure fairness. However, performance reviews are subjective, and this opens the door to gender bias. Gender bias, by definition, is the unfair differences in the way a person is treated because of their gender. We have seen many a business case telling us the benefits of a diverse leadership team; improved financial performance, more creative and innovative teams, improvements in recruiting and retaining talent just to name a few. We even have sex discrimination acts in force making it illegal to discriminate based on one’s gender. So why is bias still at play and how does it affect women’s ability to progress in the workplace? Everyone has biases. They develop over the course of our lifetime through our own experiences and exposure to messages and other influences. While bias will always be present, we can become more aware and [...]

How to Avoid Gender Bias in Performance Reviews2019-11-20T11:51:36+11:00

Avoiding the Merit Trap

2019-10-24T10:55:27+11:00

Avoiding the Merit Trap Merit is a combination of past performance and future potential. Merit is also thought of as an objective way to recruit the ‘best person for the job’ however, under the surface, it is a largely subjective measure. Hiring the ‘best person for the job’ based on merit can and does have a large impact on advancing gender equality. Many organisations cite merit as the reason for not having promoted more women into senior leadership roles. Merit though, does introduce bias to the hiring process. Many studies have shown that promotions and appointments are often based on subjective considerations as well as skill and experience. Unconscious bias comes into play across a variety of ways including affinity bias (someone like you or who you can relate to) as well as groupthink (desire for harmony and conformity). According to Global Women New Zealand, there are two key problems with the concept of meritocracy in the world of work. “The first is that bias exists at each stage of the employment process. The second is that women and men do not start from an even playing field.” Merit is a topic that has been widely discussed and [...]

Avoiding the Merit Trap2019-10-24T10:55:27+11:00

Increasing Representation Of Women On Boards

2019-10-31T11:11:21+11:00

Gaming and hospitality have historically been male-dominated industries with unconscious bias accounting for the gender gap in leadership. One form of unconscious bias is affinity bias which affects recruitment, retention and the talent pipeline. Hiring managers show a marked preference for candidates to whom they can relate which plays a key role in many selection decisions. The perception is that leaders will hire like-minded individuals with similar leadership styles; so, a heavily male workforce will more than likely be maintained. Unconscious bias also affects the representation of women on boards and an active focus is required to create and/or increase diversity. According to the ASX, the latest percentage of women on ASX200 boards is 29.5% (reported 31 October 2019). In New Zealand, figures released by the NZX show the percentage of women directors on listed company boards increased from 19.7% to 22% in 2018 – just four more women than in 2017 (reported February 2019). There is growing evidence that a diverse workforce leads to tangible and positive impacts on culture and operations. Benefits include increased efficiency, productivity, innovation, creativity and improved employee engagement. A strategic focus on a diverse workforce needs to start at the top. The composition [...]

Increasing Representation Of Women On Boards2019-10-31T11:11:21+11:00

Closing the Gender Pay Gap

2019-10-16T11:00:53+11:00

Last month on 28th August, Australia observed [Un] Equal Pay Day, marking the 59 additional days from the end of the previous financial year that women must work to earn the same pay as men. Equal Pay Day saw a flurry of social media activity, engagement and support, but it is important to remember that this issue needs year-round attention. It's equally important to remember that Equal Pay is not the only factor that contributes to the Gender Pay Gap. Particular attention needs to be paid to the social and economic factors that combine to reduce women's earning capacity over their lifetime, and what we can do about it to help close the gap. Before we explore the reasons, let's look at the what the gender pay gap is and isn't. According to the Workplace Gender Equality Agency, "the gender pay gap measures the difference between the average earnings of women and men in the workforce. It is not the difference between two people being paid differently for work of the same or comparable value, which is unlawful. This is called equal pay. The gender pay gap is an internationally established measure of women's position in the economy in comparison to men." In Australia, the gender pay [...]

Closing the Gender Pay Gap2019-10-16T11:00:53+11:00

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